Report: APP CMHS Project 4




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2.4.2. Hazard Identification

The mining inspectorate has classified the hazards based on the categories of incidents causing the accidents. The major categories of causes leading to accidents in mines are:

  • Fire, Explosion and ignition of inflammable gas and/or coal dust

  • Falls of ground (a) falls of roof (b) falls of side or face

  • Haulage and transportation

  • Explosives

  • Machinery

  • Suffocation by gases

  • Inundation

  • Electricity.

In a preliminary exercise adapted by the Directorate General of Mines Safety (DGMS) to educate mine management in risk assessment; a risk rating criteria has been suggested. The risk rating criteria is obtained by multiplying the subjective scores assigned to the consequence, exposure and the probability, to obtain the combined score for the risk occurrence. The criterion is shown in Table 10. The maximum risk rating will be 500; risks with a score of ≥ 200 are considered high risk and require immediate attention and risks with a score of < 200 and ≥ 20 require the action of management. Other hazards with < 20 score are considered low risk issues but are to be reviewed.

Table 10 Risk Rating Criteria (DGMS)

Consequence (A)

Rating score

Exposure (B)


Probability (C)


Several dead

5

Continuous

10

Expected/almost certain

10

One dead

1

Frequent(Daily)

5

Quite possible(Likely)

7

Significant chance of fatality

0.3

Seldom (Weekly)

3

Unusual but possible

3

One permanent disability

0.1

Unusual(Monthly)

2.5

Only remotely possible

2

Small chance of fatality

.01

Occasionally (Yearly)

2

Conceived but unlikely

1

Many lost time injuries

.001

Once in 5 years

1.5

Practically impossible

0.5

One lost time injury

0.001

Once in 10 years

0.5

Virtually impossible

0.1

Small injury

0.0001

Once in 100 years

0.02



Risk = Consequence x Exposure x Probability (A.B.C)
Maximum risk rating = 500

A sample hazard identification exercise done for an underground coal mine, based on this risk rating criteria, is provided in Table 11.

Table 11 Typical hazards (DGMS)

No.

Description of hazard

1

Existing mine fire

2

Roof fall (strata control)

3

Mine gases

4

Waterlogged workings

5

Survey – incorrect mine plan

6

Improper survey instruments

7

Lack of skilled persons/using unskilled persons

8

Inundation from surface source

9

Surface blasting and vibrations

10

Winding (shaft)

11

Boilers

12

Blasting

13

Spontaneous combustion

14

Unauthorised entry to mine workings

15

Coal dust - explosion

16

Lack of illumination

17

Haulage and transport failure

18

Side fall

19

Moving machinery (illegal man-riding sdl)

20

Electricity

21

Drivages not to plan

22

Fire damp CH4

23

Material handling

24

Respirable dust

25

Noise

26

Inadequate ventilation

27

Slippery roadway

28

External threat – terrorist/sabotage/indiscipline/security

29

Improper travelling roadway




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